Privacy Theories and Frameworks

Privacy Theories and Frameworks

Personal privacy is becoming an increasingly important concern as social media and Web 2.0 tools dramatically increased the amount of private data that users share on the Web, and smartphones now make users actively share location data through a variety of applications and services. The purpose of the Privacy Theories and Frameworks project is to reconsider the meaning of privacy and the tools and frameworks with which to study it.

The first line of work within this project is how new political and technological developments impact personal privacy: As the Internet of Things is starting to develop, we must consider how connecting ever-more devices to the web creates new privacy threats and also changes the ongoing negotiation about the meaning of privacy. After Snowden's revelations, we must consider privacy within the frame of ubiquitous surveillance by state actors in a multipolar world. As we learn more about the workings of social machines, we may also reconsider the meaning of 'group privacy rights' by viewing it in the light of the informational requirements for a social machine to function effectively.

The second line of work grounds theoretical understandings of privacy in the real world. We investigate the complex reasons behind why people do not act in accordance with their own state privacy preferences, and how the ways information is being presented to users influences privacy attitudes.

Publications
O'Hara, K. (2017).  Smart Contracts - Dumb Idea. IEEE Internet Computing. 21, 97-101.
Slack, A., Ottewell D., & Francis A. (2017).  Ethical Data Initiative.
Zahur, S., Wang X., Raykova M., Gascon A., Doerner J., Evans D., et al. (2016).  Revisiting Square-Root ORAM: Efficient Random Access in Multi-party Computation. 2016 {IEEE} Symposium on Security and Privacy ({SP}).
O'Hara, K. (2015).  Data, Legibility, Creativity ... and Power. IEEE Internet Computing. 19, 88-91.
O'Hara, K. (2015).  Authority Printed Upon Emptiness. IEEE Internet Computing. 19, 72-76.
O'Hara, K. (2014).  Privacy and the internet of things.
O'Hara, K. (2014).  Social machines as an approach to group privacy.
O'Hara, K., & Shadbolt N. (2014).  Who guards the guardians?. Science. 345, 387–387.
O'Hara, K. (2014).  The Fridge's Brain Sure Ain't the Icebox. IEEE Internet Computing. 18, 81-84.
Liccardi, I., Pato J., Weitzner D., Abelson H., & De Roure D. (2014).  No Technical Understanding Required: Helping Users Make Informed Choices About Access to Their Personal Data. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Computing, Networking and Services. 140–150.
Zafeiropoulou, A. M., Millard D. E., Webber C., & O'Hara K. (2013).  Unpicking the Privacy Paradox: Can Structuration Theory Help to Explain Location-based Privacy Decisions?. Proceedings of the 5th Annual ACM Web Science Conference. 463–472.
Zafeiropoulou, A. M., Millard D. E., Webber C., & Hara O'K. (2013).  Unpicking the privacy paradox. Proceedings of the 5th Annual {ACM} Web Science Conference on - {WebSci} {\textquotesingle}13.
O'Hara, K., & Shadbolt N. (2008).  The Spy in the Coffee Machine: The End of Privacy As We Know It.