Political Social Machines

Political Social Machines

In this project, we explore the impact the digital revolution has had on politics across the globe. From the UK referendum, through the US election, to the rise of e-populism and online extremism, social machines are a key part of the way politics and political movements are being shaped by the web.

We explore visions for what politics can do in a digital world and how this could affect our communities and the broader society, as well as conduct practical assessments of the impact web technologies have had on government systems and processes. The project also addresses the development of political ecosystems, which encompass governments, citizens and communities and how governments themselves can be seen as social machines within this ecosystem.

Publications
Murthy, D., Powell A., Tinati R., Anstead N., Carr L., Halford S., et al. (2016).  Automation, Algorithms, and Politics| Bots and Political Influence: A Sociotechnical Investigation of Social Network Capital. International Journal of Communication. 10,
O'Hara, K., & Stevens D. (2015).  Echo Chambers and Online Radicalism: Assessing the Internet's Complicity in Violent Extremism. Policy & Internet. 7, 401–422.
Tiropanis, T., Rowland-Campbell A., & Hall W. (2014).  Government As a Social Machine in an Ecosystem. Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on World Wide Web. 903–904.
O'Hara, K. (2013).  Social Machine Politics Are Here to Stay. IEEE Internet Computing. 17, 87-90.
O'Hara, K. (2013).  The Many-Headed e-Monster. IEEE Internet Computing. 17, 88-92.
O'Hara, K., & Stevens D. (2009).  The Devil's Long Tail: Religious Moderation and Extremism on the Web. IEEE Intelligent Systems. 24, 37-43.